I read your article and am surprised that you did not mention the purpose of the meeting was to convince the Commissioners to waive private property rights of Missouri citizens and grant eminent domain to a private for profit business, not a public utility.

*Editor's Note: This opinion is in response to an article titled “Grain Belt draws fire, but also praise” published in the Thursday, Dec. 8 Courier-Post, regarding a Missouri Public Service Commission public hearing held in Hannibal regarding the Grain Belt Express wind energy project.

I read your article and am surprised that you did not mention the purpose of the meeting was to convince the Commissioners to waive private property rights of Missouri citizens and grant eminent domain to a private for profit business, not a public utility. You also failed to mention that this power line will require federal subsidies, tax dollars to get it off the ground and to support it, not profiting Missouri but the venture capitalists that are trying so desperately to take away the legal rights of the citizens of Missouri. This is not a proposal designed to help Missouri we are just in the way of their final goal to sell electricity to the East Coast.  Which in itself is a pipe dream as this year the first American wind power plants were built off the coast of Rhode Island, more are in the works along the eastern seaboard. There is no need for Missouri to give up their rights so the East coast can have wind power.

This is not your everyday power line. In fact nothing this powerful has ever been built and they do not even know if it is possible. Colorado had a concern about large wattage power lines in their state and they settled on the lines being put underground in the highway right of way.  That would cost more but could be done without taking anyone's property from them in what will be the biggest land grab by a private business we have seen so far. Our laws are to protect all of our citizens , not pit one against the other. If Hannibal and St Louis are so sure this will help them, put the lines in their towns not across the farmland, preserves and habitats of this state.

— DeAnne Wickens, Ralls County