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Editor’s note: Following is the second part of a story series by contributing writer Brent Engel. It contains language that some may find objectionable. Discretion is advised.

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Editor’s note: Following is the first part of a story series by contributing writer Brent Engel. It contains language that some may find objectionable. Discretion is advised.

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George W. Pine, the third in succession of eight known children born to William H. and Maria P. Sanders Pine, spent a portion of his childhood in a house still standing at 3700 James Road. Bel…

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LOUISIANA, Mo. — January would prove an important month for John Brooks Henderson.

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“There is a saying that it is always darkest just before day, if this is true then methinks it must be near day dawn in Missouri, for surely it can hardly get much darker than now.” Diary entr…

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While A.B. Sweeney was in the act of drawing molasses from a barrel at his family grocery store in late April 1860, the camphene lamp he used as a light source somehow “took fire and exploded,…

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COLUMBIA, Mo. — Two of the three gifts of the Wise Men — frankincense and myrrh — remain in high demand more than 5,000 years after gaining popularity in religious rituals, says University of …

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William Price Carstarphen, born in 1830 to Ralls County slave-holding parents, worked as a druggist in Hannibal, Mo., during the Civil War years, 1860-1864. Upon his death in 1910 he left behi…

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Augusta McKee Griffen was a woman ahead of her time. Born post-Civil War, in 1869, she not only raised five children to adulthood, but also served as the catalyst behind the successful establi…

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Oh, to be a mouse in the corner of the one-story brick and frame house, situated at 109 North Seventh Street, during the late afternoon and early evening of May 23, 1891.

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As early as 1894, Callie Taylor, daughter of a pioneer Methodist minister from Lewis County, Mo., taught educational fundamentals to the children of Ralls County, who lived nearby to Oakwood. …

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On Sunday evenings back in the day, Hannibal’s black churches (Second Christian on Broadway, Helping Hand Baptist, the Church of God in Christ on Settles Street and Scott’s Chapel Methodist) h…

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LOUISIANA, Mo. — Before they could duel, they got drunk.

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In 1950, German-born Herman Robert Glasenapp, a trained eisengiesser, (iron worker) was employed as a janitor at Hannibal High school on McMaster’s Avenue, following the 1943 closing of the Ha…

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Drawing a conclusion from studying Sanborn maps and city directories, it is likely that Charles Lavoo’s meat market was the first occupant of the building at 2300 Market Street.

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LOUISIANA, Mo. — Thirteenth Amendment author John Brooks Henderson might have gone along with changes being considered by voters in five states, and one that almost made it onto the ballot in …

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Resting below an awning of tree branches at Hannibal’s Holy Family Cemetery are the remains of the Rev. Denis Kennedy. Irish by birth and educated in St. Louis, Rev. Kennedy served the Immacul…

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CLARKSVILLE, Mo. — A man known for his steel resolve saved Clarksville from a Confederate guerilla who once broke up a wedding to enlist recruits.

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In 1890, the Cincinnati Enquirer set out to identify sets of triplets (then aged 5 or younger) which resided in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana or Kentucky.

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Nearly a dozen boys in their mid teens gathered together on Sunday morning, July 1, 1924, at what was then known as the Scyoc farm, located on the Paris Gravel Road, a mile west of Oakwood.

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Sixteen-year-old Eliza Drane, with her deep blue eyes, golden hair and a dazzling complexion, was among the students featured in an entertainment offering at Convent Hall, St. Joseph’s Academy…

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Sept. 3, 1865: Father John Cummings is arrested after saying Mass at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Louisiana. His crime? Failing to recite the new state constitution’s “loyalty oath” enacted a…

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When Bettie (Williams Doxey) Whisler boarded one of the two Quincy, Ill.-bound steamboats docked along Hannibal’s riverfront following the fireworks display on July 4, 1902, she carried with h…

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There was a fire, in Hannibal’s distant past, the latest in a series of suspected incendiary fires, which served as a tipping point toward the establishment of Hannibal’s first official fire d…

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During the later years of the 19th Century, John F. Turner (1857-1937) — son of Civil War-era Marion County businessman ‘Ras Turner — opened a store at 314 (later renumbered 2320) Market Street.

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By the beginning of the 20th century, the concept of transporting live cattle to the Chicago markets for processing had been — for the most part — replaced by the opening of regional packing p…