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The evening before her wedding, April 28, 1924, Hattie Flood was giddy with anticipation. At home in her parents’ small, pastel stucco house, located in a residential area at 837 East 23rd St.…

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A single story, brick, five-bay house rests upon one of Hannibal’s highest rock bluffs, overlooking the vastness of the hills and valleys carved throughout the centuries by the greatest North …

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Four historic oaks surround a two-story frame house at 3520 Hamilton Street, in the Oakwood neighborhood of Hannibal, Mo. If those trees could somehow talk, they could share insight into the d…

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In mid August 1861, Ellen Benton, a guest in the hill-top home of her sister, Sarah Benton Selmes, penned a diary entry describing the state of anxiety existing in Hannibal, Mo., following the…

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The building in which Melpontian Hall was contained was standing on the northeast corner of Third and Center streets in Hannibal, Mo., as early as April 1855, when the Episcopal and Universali…

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Early on Saturday morning, June 11, 1927, a car packed with Northeast Missouri natives and their travel gear, left Hannibal, Mo., en route to Enid, Okla. C.W. Barrett, 78, publisher of The Can…

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In 1879, Mrs. Julia M. Bennett could typically be found seated behind a desk in the Hannibal Courier’s newspaper office, located on the second floor of 123 N. Main St. There, she would judicio…

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George Mifflin Dallas Conley is most likely a name will that not ring a bell with any current resident of Hannibal, Mo. He came to town from Jefferson County, West Virginia, circa 1878, and sl…

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Just one week after graduating from Hannibal High School with the Class of 1912, Roy P. Schwartz performed the grim task of walking alongside a hearse carrying his friend and classmate, Cranda…

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Along Market street in the Hannibal, Mo., neighborhood known as Oakwood, two brick buildings stand today which represent the business prosperity of Oakwood and its agricultural neighbors durin…

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In the Bear Creek bottoms, south of what is now known as Market Street in Hannibal, Mo., once existed the Star Lime Company. During the kiln construction in May 1894, creatures of nature did t…

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A Bible school class, meeting in an upstairs room over the Link mercantile store during the late 1880s, served as the precursor to what would become the first church in the little hamlet of Oa…

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During the early morning hours of the last day of July, in the year 1917, the westbound Burlington fast passenger train Number 16, en route from Denver to St. Louis, was saved from a potential…

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Walking his rounds during the night shift of May 11, 1906, George W. Ham, a patrolman for the Hannibal, Mo., police department, encountered a well-dressed, albeit inebriated, 30-year-old man s…

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The March 28, 1925, edition of the Hannibal Courier-Post was in actuality a celebration of photography. Not action photography, as we are accustomed to today, but rather studio photography.

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In his 87th year, during the final month of 1894, retired tanner and merchant Robert D. Brewington of Hannibal, Mo., professed to the Hannibal Courier-Post that he was the oldest living Odd Fe…