HANNIBAL – Without needing to offer physical labor, several Hannibalians are participating in the construction of a the current Habitat for Humanity house at 1721 Rackcliffe.

HANNIBAL – Without needing to offer physical labor, several Hannibalians are participating in the construction of a the current Habitat for Humanity house at 1721 Rackcliffe.

“We want to give people an opportunity to contribute who are not physically able to work themselves,” said Bill Northcutt, who is coordinating this program.

He is familiar with the work of the Mark Twain Area Habitat for Humanity, with its board members including his sister, Linda Clark, along with other fellow members of his Park United Methodist Church.

When Northcutt learned some people wanted to help Habitat but were not physically able to work themselves, he contacted some Amish carpenters who had worked for him.

“They built a hay shed and a garage for me, and I know what good workers they are,” he said.

“It takes $128 to sponsor one.”

They are charging $16 an hour, and Northcutt is accepting donations of $128 for an Amish worker's eight-hour day.

Three couples have already made donations to help Habitat build the house, Northcutt reported. “All are from Arch UMC.”

“If anyone would like to take part, they can contact me, and I will coordinate it,” he said, welcoming calls to 573-221-6834.

Buddy Tarleton and Tom Lennon, co-chairmen or the area Habitat building committee, were working on the house on Thursday, July 25. Tarleton was pleased to report what a good job the Amish had done on Wednesday, hanging the drywall.

Northcutt is eager for people to know how much difference a Habitat house can make in the owner's life. “That house changes people's lives,” he said. “Some charities you have to repeat each year, but Habitat is different. You build that Habitat house, and it changes them. We have a good Habitat board.”

The current house will be the home of Shelby Snow and her daughter, Nevah.

Habitat had a one-day blitz build on her house on April 27, led by Chris Doyle. On that day, Habitat Board President Brad Kurz explained the home owner is required to provide several hundred hours of sweat equity on their home, and Snow had done this since the beginning, “working right along with the guys.”

Tarleton said the house is expected to be completed by late fall. “I'm looking at October or November.”

bdarr@courierpost.com