Five women in the process of furthering their understanding and becoming teachers at Emily Trevathan’s yoga studio, Twisted Juniper, want to offer the community an introductory yoga afternoon from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 14

Have you ever wondered what goes on in a yoga class? Is it all it’s hyped up to be: a body-mind-spirit experience, a way of looking at life in a more balanced way, a deepening of self-care in a busy, often confusing world?

Five women in the process of furthering their understanding and becoming teachers at Emily Trevathan’s yoga studio, Twisted Juniper, want to offer the community an introductory yoga afternoon from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 14, with sessions for beginners (1:15 to 2 p.m.), families with children (2:15 to 2:45 p.m.), and adult “all levels” (3 to 4 p.m., accompanied by the instrumental blues/jazz music of Jerry Rosenkrans), hosted by Rialto Banquet Hall at 601 Broadway.

The cost? A donation.

Each student-teacher has picked a charity they are passionate about: the NEMO Humane Society for animals needing adoption, Avenues for women and children in vulnerable situations, Buddy Packs for children facing hunger, Down Country for their mission of inclusivity for all children with all abilities and Loaves and Fishes helping the hungry and homeless.

To attend the Yogathon, simply bring a donation in cash or product to give to one or more of the charities — and experience for yourself why women and men from all walks of life and body types find themselves drawn to yoga. After one class. One hour. One experience.

The teachers — Kallie, Karen, Natasha, Talya, Tara — wanted to take a step beyond classes. They wanted a deeper experience because they found in yoga a way to integrate their lives. As wives, mothers, professional women, women of faith, entrepreneurs, they know what a busy chaotic life can look like. But with yoga, they find themselves renewed — and part of yoga is sharing.

Why do these women want to become teachers? “I just wanted to know more. I noticed yoga made changes not only in my physical body but my mental state.” “Part of being a yogi is teaching and sharing.” “I can come to yoga and it helps me sort through things. It’s time for me. It’s my self-care.” “I felt a strong calling, diving deeper into a practice that has given me profound transformation.” “Yoga allows me to find my calm and peace when I need it most.”

Each of these women connect self-care with community care and giving back.

Yoga is not for women only. More and more men are becoming avid participants. The Sunday, April 14 Twisted Juniper Yogathon embraces all body types, all abilities, and — all children.

Emily Trevathan said, “Kids go into turtle pose or spaghetti body, and they become so still, teachers admit they’ve never seen such a thing.”

Yoga, perhaps, is a way back to that childhood wonder. Come and experience it.

For more information, contact Emily Trevathan at 573-719-8545, Emily@twistedjuniper.com or on the Facebook Event Page: TJ Yogathon:Kindness in Action.