If you haven’t already, you should accept it: you’re not going to love everything a government, school district or taxing entity will do.

If you haven’t already, you should accept it: you’re not going to love everything a government, school district or taxing entity will do.

In fact, some of you think the aforementioned can do little correctly.

But in any case, decisions made by people who have some degree of power in your life aren’t always the most popular. Those types of decisions are made every day.

The question is: what now?

Do you take a back seat and throw your hands up? Do you write a letter or make a phone call of complaint? Do you villify and villainize over Facebook?

A group of shrewd and savvy ladies in the Hannibal area recognized a decision they found less than stellar: the chloramination of the Hannibal water system.

For those who don’t know, the Hannibal Board of Public Works added chloramines into the water as a disinfectant on Sept. 28 to get into compliance with EPA standards on disinfection byproducts.

This group of women, concerned for the wellbeing of their children and grandchildren, performed individual research on chloramines and didn’t like what they saw, despite BPW standing behind the decision.

The ladies organized.

They didn’t complain behind the comfort of a computer as many are want to do.

They reached out to professionals and other like-minded people.

They got involved, scheduling meetings, initiating discussions and fielding questions from others.

They formed a platform with evidence to support their argument.

And the wheels, however slowly, are beginning to turn.

The BPW said this week that there would be a re-examination process on parts of engineering studies performed three years ago. That’s a least a small victory for this group of concerned citizens.

This editorial isn’t a commentary on the chloramination of Hannibal’s water. It’s a commentary on the power of an idea.

In this case, the group doesn’t want chloramines in the water. But it could really be anything.

When faced with something challenging, it’s easy to gripe and groan.

It’s far more difficult to put your foot down, get organized and commit to a common goal.

But it sure is a much more effective way to enact change.

 

The views expressed in this opinion represent the majority of the Courier-Post editorial staff.