Two Northeast Missouri school superintendents applauded Gov. Jay Nixon decision Friday to veto a bill aimed at revamping Missouri's student transfer law.

Two Northeast Missouri school superintendents applauded Gov. Jay Nixon decision Friday to veto a bill aimed at revamping Missouri’s student transfer law.

“I am relieved that Gov. Nixon decided to veto HB42,” said Susan Johnson, superintendent of the Hannibal public school district. “Public school districts need to maintain local control and monies need to be put towards supporting our existing school districts rather than supporting new charter schools and virtual education.”

“Student transfer legislation is an attempt to create opportunity without taking into account the full range of issues that contribute to student success and community sustainability,” said Jim Masters, superintendent of the Monroe City school district. “As HB 42 worked its way to through the legislative process, it became a soapbox for a variety of schooling notions, preferences and concerns that ultimately had little to do with the challenge it set out to address.

“We support the governor’s veto, not as the final word on this issue, but in recognizing that quality educational opportunities are best created through processes that offer the greatest level of informed discussion and community participation.”

The legislation proposed accrediting individual buildings, not just entire districts.

The idea was that some schools likely perform well, even if their district as a whole does not. Students in unaccredited buildings, under the measure, would have been able to switch to accredited ones in their home district, with the goal of keeping students and tuition dollars close to home.

But the bill also included contested provisions that would expand some students’ access to charter and virtual schools.

The Democratic governor said the online schools provision included no oversight or public accountability for student performance at those schools.

“As the legislative process unfolded, this bill veered off track,” Nixon said in a statement. “By the time it got to my desk, it mandated expensive voucher schemes, neglected accountability, and skirted the major, underlying difficulties in the transfer law, while creating a host of potential new problems for districts across the state.”

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Reach reporter Danny Henley at danny.henley@courierpost.com .