On a night when the Hannibal Cavemen won, they still wound up losing. It's been that kind of season for the Prospect League team that calls Clemens Field home.

On a night when the Hannibal Cavemen won, they still wound up losing. It’s been that kind of season for the Prospect League team that calls Clemens Field home.

The loss suffered overnight Wednesday will not be reflected in the team’s win-loss record, but in its pocketbook after it lost items to the flash flooding that struck low-lying areas along Warren Barrett Drive in Hannibal early Thursday morning.

“We have lost some product from our concession stand. Some of our merchandise in the team store has been damaged so we’ll have to get rid of it unfortunately,” said Deron Johnson, director of marketing and sales for the Cavemen.

Receiving a call regarding flash flooding did not shock Johnson.

“We’ve known the creek has been high and the river has been high, so I wasn’t shocked when I got the call, no,” he said. “Knowing this could happen, I was monitoring the weather closely last night, checking radar. I knew we were getting a ton of rain.”

As of 7 a.m., Hannibal had received 3.28 inches of rain, according to the National Weather Service.

The overnight deluge did not cause near the flash-flood issues in Hannibal that 3.4 inches of precipitation did on July 20, 2010.

“We had some minor flash flooding along the Bear Creek basin. Nothing to the severity we saw almost five years ago, thank God,” said John Hark, Hannibal’s emergency management director. “I don’t think it got in any homes.”

Residents signed up for the emergency phone advisory service were contacted twice.

“We had a Code Red call at approximately 2:30 last night countywide for flash flooding and then we put out a Code Red call ourselves this morning at about 5:15 or 5:20 to everybody along the Bear Creek basin, telling them that there was the potential for flash flooding,” said Hark. “We had the Police Department out going door to door waking people up, telling them about the potential of flooding.”

According to Lt. John Zerbonia of HPD, all four officers on duty at the time helped contact residents.

“We stuck to the low-lying areas that we believed would be affected,” he said, adding that it is not uncommon for officers to warn residents when flash flooding is likely.

The fact the community experienced some flash flooding Wednesday night was not unexpected, according to Hark.

“You never know which way those storms are going to track or how much rain they’re going to drop,” he said. “I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt before 5 o’clock this morning we were going to have some rain and thunderstorms. How much we were going to get I had no idea. Bear Creek runs a long way out. Thank God we control that with the dam, but we have a lot of tributaries here in town.

“When we get a widespread heavy downpour, with the ground saturated the way it is right now, it can’t soak up any more water and everything is going to be rapid runoff. Rapid runoff raises creeks and unfortunately you have flash flooding.”

 

Reach reporter Danny Henley at danny.henley@courierpost.com .