Hannibal public schools' summer school program came to a conclusion Friday, June 19. Darin Powell, assistant superintendent, assessed a high grade to the three-week session.

Hannibal public schools’ summer school program came to a conclusion Friday, June 19. Darin Powell, assistant superintendent, assessed a high grade to the three-week session.

“We were extremely happy with how it went,” Powell told the Board of Education during its Wednesday night meeting.

The summer session began on June 1 with few, if any, complications. That fact pleased Powell.

“Summer school opened very smoothly with very few issues due to the diligence of all of the staff hired, including teachers, administrators, clerical staff, aides, cafeteria and transportation,” wrote Powell in a memo to the school board.

Enrollment this year was 902, which Powell noted was “down a hair” from 2014 when 927 students participated. He added that this year’s enrollment slightly exceeded the average over the past two years — 892.5.

This year’s total marked the fourth time in the past six years that Hannibal’s summer school enrollment has topped 900. The peak during that period was 998 in 2011.

Student totals reached three-year highs in pre-kindergarten (115), middle school remediation, grades 6-8, (65) and middle school enrichment, grades 5-7, (138).

Enrollment was at a three-year low in two areas — early childhood special education and high school credit recovery. Twelve students were a part of the early childhood special education program, down from 30 in 2014 and 29 in 2013. A total of 70 students took part at the high school in credit recovery, compared with 98 in 2013 and 97 in 2014.

Enrollment in the high school enrichment program — 133 — missed by just one student of equaling last year’s total. The number of elementary youngsters — 369 — was down by 18 from 2014, but exceeded 2013’s total by 41.

Attendance during the summer session was monitored closely, according to Powell, adding that as enrollment declined, as it typically does, staff numbers were reduced to keep the program “cost effective.”