No toys have ever inspired imagination, creativity, and problem-solving in the way that Legos have. This has given LEGO a longevity unlike any other toy, as they are popular with children as play-things and adults as collectable items. However, Legos as toys was just the beginning; since its creation in 1949, LEGO has gone on to create video games, cartoons, amusement parks, and finally a full-length blockbuster movie. As someone who fondly remembers Legos being my favorite toys as a child, naturally I was extremely excited to see if the movie could reach my oh-so-high childhood expectations. The result: I was one-hundred percent impressed. While many would consider it to be a children’s movie, the hilarious script, witty pop-culture references, stunning visual effects, and artful usage of 3-D technology, computer animation, and stop-motion animation are enough to successfully entertain audience members of any age.


The Lego Movie is centered on the quest of an overly average construction worker named Emmet’s (voiced by Chris Pratt of NBC’s Parks and Rec) quest to save the world from the evil Lord Business (Will Ferrell), after he is mistaken as “The Special”, a prophesied master builder. Along the way, Emmet comes across a wide variety of famous characters that Lego has made, such as Batman, Superman, Gandalf, Han Solo, Dumbledore, and Abraham Lincoln to name just a few. While this simple plot in a “1984”-esque world seems rather childish at first, what makes the movie more entertaining to older audiences is the all-star cast members voicing each character. Some of the most notable cast members are Morgan Freeman, Charlie Day, Channing Tatum, Nick Offerman, Jonah Hill, Will Arnett, Elizabeth Banks, Shaq, Will Forte, and Liam Neeson.


I left the theater with one question: Was the movie really meant for kids? As an animated film with some simple humor involved, I think it was. However, I also think it was largely meant for an older audience, which made it quite enjoyable. I doubt that elementary-age kids will find many lines and references humorous, such as Han Solo saying, “Chewy, hit the hyper-drive”, Abraham Lincoln noting, “A house divided against itself would be better than this”, Lucy advising, “come with me if you want to not die”, or Batman’s song lyrics, “Darkness…No parents…Super rich…kind of makes it better”. Children certainly won’t appreciate the fact that Billy Dee Williams and Anthony Daniels voice Lando Calrissian and C-3PO, nor will they catch the irony in the sickeningly catchy theme song, “Everything is Awesome”, performed by Tegan and Sarah and The Lonely Island, which assists the movie’s underlying motive-poking fun at people’s modern-day conformity.


For children and adults alike, the moral of the story is the same: It is important for people to never stop exercising their creativity, and everyone should make time for play instead than work. It also reminds adults that they should avoid getting too caught up in the rules, routines, and overall conformity of everyday life. Appropriately described by critics as “the brilliant hybrid offspring of Pixar’s best infused with ‘South Park’s’ irreverent humor”, and “a kids’ movie that matches shameless fun with razor-sharp wit, that offers up a spectacle of pure, freewheeling joy even as it tackles the thorniest of issues. It’s part ‘South Park,’ part ‘Lord of the Rings'; part ‘The Matrix,’ part ‘Idiocracy”, The Lego Movie should be hailed as one of the best, most well rounded animated films to have ever graced the big screen.


No toys have ever inspired imagination, creativity, and problem-solving in the way that Legos have. This has given LEGO a longevity unlike any other toy, as they are popular with children as play-things and adults as collectable items. However, Legos as toys was just the beginning; since its creation in 1949, LEGO has gone on to create video games, cartoons, amusement parks, and finally a full-length blockbuster movie. As someone who fondly remembers Legos being my favorite toys as a child, naturally I was extremely excited to see if the movie could reach my oh-so-high childhood expectations. The result: I was one-hundred percent impressed. While many would consider it to be a children’s movie, the hilarious script, witty pop-culture references, stunning visual effects, and artful usage of 3-D technology, computer animation, and stop-motion animation are enough to successfully entertain audience members of any age.

The Lego Movie is centered on the quest of an overly average construction worker named Emmet’s (voiced by Chris Pratt of NBC’s Parks and Rec) quest to save the world from the evil Lord Business (Will Ferrell), after he is mistaken as “The Special”, a prophesied master builder. Along the way, Emmet comes across a wide variety of famous characters that Lego has made, such as Batman, Superman, Gandalf, Han Solo, Dumbledore, and Abraham Lincoln to name just a few. While this simple plot in a “1984”-esque world seems rather childish at first, what makes the movie more entertaining to older audiences is the all-star cast members voicing each character. Some of the most notable cast members are Morgan Freeman, Charlie Day, Channing Tatum, Nick Offerman, Jonah Hill, Will Arnett, Elizabeth Banks, Shaq, Will Forte, and Liam Neeson.

I left the theater with one question: Was the movie really meant for kids? As an animated film with some simple humor involved, I think it was. However, I also think it was largely meant for an older audience, which made it quite enjoyable. I doubt that elementary-age kids will find many lines and references humorous, such as Han Solo saying, “Chewy, hit the hyper-drive”, Abraham Lincoln noting, “A house divided against itself would be better than this”, Lucy advising, “come with me if you want to not die”, or Batman’s song lyrics, “Darkness…No parents…Super rich…kind of makes it better”. Children certainly won’t appreciate the fact that Billy Dee Williams and Anthony Daniels voice Lando Calrissian and C-3PO, nor will they catch the irony in the sickeningly catchy theme song, “Everything is Awesome”, performed by Tegan and Sarah and The Lonely Island, which assists the movie’s underlying motive-poking fun at people’s modern-day conformity.

For children and adults alike, the moral of the story is the same: It is important for people to never stop exercising their creativity, and everyone should make time for play instead than work. It also reminds adults that they should avoid getting too caught up in the rules, routines, and overall conformity of everyday life. Appropriately described by critics as “the brilliant hybrid offspring of Pixar’s best infused with ‘South Park’s’ irreverent humor”, and “a kids’ movie that matches shameless fun with razor-sharp wit, that offers up a spectacle of pure, freewheeling joy even as it tackles the thorniest of issues. It’s part ‘South Park,’ part ‘Lord of the Rings'; part ‘The Matrix,’ part ‘Idiocracy”, The Lego Movie should be hailed as one of the best, most well rounded animated films to have ever graced the big screen.