Education

Early Bird Kiwanis to offer school zone signs


PIXABAY/CONTRIBUTED
By Hannibal Courier-Post
Posted: Aug. 13, 2020 11:53 am

HANNIBAL | Some Hannibal school zones could feature new signage during the upcoming school year thanks to a local service club.

During last week's meeting of the Hannibal Traffic Committee, Andy Dorian, the city's director of central services, reported he had been contacted by representatives of the Early Bird Kiwanis Club regarding it providing some signs for at least some Hannibal school zones.

“The Kiwanis would pay for them,” Dorian said. “We would just put them up on our posts in school zones.”

According to Dorian, signs similar to those being offered to Hannibal are already in use in Palmyra.

“It has been pretty successful there,” he said.

It is unclear if one or more of the 7-inch by 18-inch signs will be installed in each of the city's school zones.

“I don't know how many we would do,” Dorian said. “We will find out how many school zone posts we have and then we will see what they (Early Bird Kiwanis) want to do financially.”

It was noted that some schools have multiple school zones.

“Oakwood (Elementary) has three school zones, so that would be six signs,” said traffic committee member Rich Dauma.

The placement of Kiwanis Club signs may not be limited to just Hannibal's elementary schools.

“We definitely need one by the high school where they (student drivers) pull out,” said traffic committee member Susan Osterhout.

The message conveyed on the signs could vary.

“I wish it would have both 'buckle up' and 'no texting,'” Osterhout said.

While Dauma does not oppose adding the Kiwanis' signs to the existing school zone posts, he did caution against trying to send too many messages.

Before a decision regarding the signs' message is finalized traffic committee members will be consulted, Dorian said.

 

 

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