As I drive around the streets of Hannibal I have on occasion found myself wondering why certain streets were given the names they have. To be sure it's nothing I lose sleep over, but it does make me wonder.

As I drive around the streets of Hannibal I have on occasion found myself wondering why certain streets were given the names they have. To be sure it's nothing I lose sleep over, but it does make me wonder.

Some streets were named for obvious reasons. For example, I would have liked to have seen the boulder that was unearthed when Rock Street was named. It must have been a dandy.

Considering the topography of this community I am not surprised that there is a Hill Street. What does surprise me is that there are not some adaptations to Hill Street elsewhere, such as Bigger Hill Street or Really Big Hill Street.

Then there is North Street. While certainly not the street that is furthest north in 21st Century Hannibal, I'm assuming at one point, maybe when a kid named Sam Clemens prowled the streets, it held the distinction of being the street that was on the city's north side.

What about Bird Street? Was it named because at one time there were so many feathered fowl in that area? Or maybe it was named by a diehard Boston Celtics fan whose favorite player was one Larry Bird. Just a theory.

While in my mind Bird Street is a tossup regarding whether it was named for actual birds or someone named Bird, there are numerous streets in Hannibal that obviously were named in honor of someone. But for the life of me I have no idea what they might have done to warrant such recognition.

I am sure there are streets, parks, ball fields and buildings in this town that are named for individuals who, in their day, did something or maybe multiple "somethings" that made them stand head and shoulders above everyone else.

Unless someone at the parks department decides to name a urinal after me when they build the new riverfront restrooms, I am fairly certain I will eventually pass from this world in relative obscurity, which I can accept. But my wife, Nancy, is another matter. She already has something named after her. It's not a street or a park, but a “game.”

Our daughter-in-law, Whitney, advised us of this fact recently. Awarding the designation was our 4-year-old granddaughter Evelyn, who just adores her Grandma Nancy because of all the fun things that Nancy is happy to do with her when they are together — draw with sidewalk chalk, go for walks, read books, etc.

How much does Evelyn love Nancy? After a March trip to see Evelyn and celebrate her birthday, Evelyn advised her parents she was willing to share their bedroom if it meant Grandma Nancy could sleep in her room and stay forever.

Apparently Whitney learned of the game when Evelyn invited her mom to sit down and join her in a game of Grandma Nancy.

"How do you play the game?" asked Whitney.

"You quilt," replied Evelyn.

While I was puzzled by Evelyn's game instructions, Nancy set me straight, pointing out that Evelyn is likely aware that Nancy has made quilts for Evelyn's mom and dad, and for her, as well as for her younger sister, Alice.

Earlier this month Nancy spent over a week watching her 3-year-old grandson, Aiden, in advance of the birth of his little brother, Jackson.

After getting to know his G-Ma Henley a lot better during her stay, I can't help but believe that Aiden will soon be playing his own version of the Grandma Nancy Game.

The views expressed in this column are not necessarily those of the Courier-Post.