One of these days my wife, Nancy, and I are going to have a massive yard sale. I guess when you live in the same location for over three decades as we have it stands to reason that a lot of stuff - Nancy refers to it as "clutter" - would accumulate.

One of these days my wife, Nancy, and I are going to have a massive yard sale. I guess when you live in the same location for over three decades as we have it stands to reason that a lot of stuff - Nancy refers to it as "clutter" - would accumulate.

This future sale that I'm referring to will undoubtedly feature "treasures" currently residing in our basement. Contributions will also come from two bedrooms which have transitioned into storage areas over time because they no longer have occupants. I am also confident that some items will come from a storage area that was created when a new kitchen and bedroom were added on to the house before we bought it.

While not the catch-all areas that the basement and spare bedrooms have become, the other storage area holds its fair share of things that are not used on a daily, or weekly, or even in some cases, a monthly basis. That part of the Henley hacienda is where we store things such as our extension and step ladders, two heat-singed barbecue grills and four lawnmowers.

A logical question would be: Why would someone with a yard so small require what amounts to a "fleet" of grass-cutting apparatus?

One of the mowers is a push mower that likely dates back to when Nancy and I were newlyweds living in Neosho. As I recall it didn't work particularly good then and I can't imagine its well-worn blades would perform any better now than they did roughly 40 years ago.

Two of the devices are gas-powered push mowers, only one of which I am even semi-confident I could get started on any given day.

Because of the growing challenges I have had starting my gas-powered mowers my oldest son, Caleb, called shortly before Easter this spring inquiring if I would be interested in another mower that he was willing to guarantee would be far easier to start than anything I've had before. That is how I came into possession of an electric mower.

It is frequently said that in the parent-child relationship that roles are frequently reversed at some point in time. I experienced that sensation as I listened to my son explain the do's and don'ts of operating an electric mower before I was entrusted to go solo for the first time.

Among the important rules I had to acknowledge was to not try to mow when the grass is wet. My initial reaction to that guideline was "Duh! Wouldn't any garden-variety fool know that moisture and electricity don't play well together?"

But then it hit me. Caleb might remember from his childhood times when his dear, old dad could be seen trying to get the yard mowed as the initial raindrops fell ahead of a spring shower or a summer storm. Consequently I kept my "duh" to myself and instead nodded in agreement.

Another vital point he shared was that I need to remain vigilant at all times regarding where the power cord is in relationship to the mower's blades. In short, be careful and don't cut the cord.

One would think that keeping tabs on a bright orange cord in dark green grass, all right weeds, would be easy to do for someone who does not suffer from colorblindness, but I have to confess I have had a couple of close calls.

While as advertised the electric mower has been a breeze to start and it delivers a nice cut, it seems to take far longer to mow my "postage stamp" of a yard than it did previously. While that may be simply because I'm slowing down, it could also be because I am spending more time being careful not to clip my "tail.”

The views expressed in this column are not necessarily those of the Courier-Post.