The selection of baby names is of even greater interest to me at this time. As I write this column on Saturday morning I am awaiting news regarding the birth of another grandson to my daughter, Amber, and her husband, Shawn.

Although it has been over two decades since my wife, Nancy, and I had to consider coming up with a name for a child, I still enjoy seeing what names that moms and dads come up with for their little ones.

The selection of baby names is of even greater interest to me at this time. As I write this column on Saturday morning I am awaiting news regarding the birth of another grandson to my daughter, Amber, and her husband, Shawn.

Thus far there have been no hints as to what names are under consideration by Amber and Shawn. Knowing my daughter and her hubby they will select something that is nice and solid as they did when their first son, Aiden Grey, was born a little over three years ago.

There are any number of sources where parents can go for help in coming up with names, ranging from the traditional to the unusual.

According to the Good Housekeeping website - www.goodhousekeeping.com - some of this year’s most popular baby names for boys are expected to be Amos (given serious consideration when my first son came along four decades ago; Caleb won out), Archer, Arrow (would go great with Archer as a first and middle name tandem), Baxter (last popular in the 1920s), Bowie, Dylan, Felix (means the lucky one), Forrest (I’m still thinking Gump), Gideon (a biblical name that’s reportedly growing in popularity), Gus, Lachlan, Loxley, McCoy, Monty, Ozzie (reminds me of the former Cardinals star shortstop), Quincy, Ray (like Quincy a gender-neutral name), Roman, Sage (means wise), Sayer (billed as an alternative to Sawyer), Thor (Marvel movie fans are behind its growth in popularity), Wilder and Winston. There were other names listed, but if I could not pronounce it or tell what gender it was best suited to go with I did not bother including it.

And in case you’re wondering, some of the more unusual/popular girl names are projected to be Astrid, Aviva, Bea, Clara, Dashiell, Delphine, Echo, Fiona, Greer, Ines, Iris, Lark, Marguerite, Persephone, Sadie, Sasha, Tallulah, Vera, Winnie and Zelda.

Maybe even more interesting than the names that are being chosen for babies are the names that some parents are regretting having given their offspring.

According to a survey conducted by Mumsnet.com, one in five parents wish they had given their child a different name. Of the group 25 percent said they believe the name they picked is too commonly used. Twenty-one percent said the name “just never felt right.” Another 20 percent said they never liked the name and had been “pressured” into using it.

Other reasons given by survey responders included: “It’s not distinctive enough;” “It causes him/her problems with spelling/pronunciation;” “It doesn’t suit him/her;” and “Everyone calls him/her by a shortened version of the name, which I don’t like.”

Three percent of those who expressed regret said there had been a “shift in public perception of the name since my child was born.”

Names making the “regret list” include Amelia, Alex, Anne, Anthony, Charlotte, Daniel, David, Emily, Frederick, Jack, Jacob, James, Jay, Jayne, Joseph, Lily, Louise, May, Oscar and Ruby. (A note to my youngest son, Jacob, I never had any regrets regarding your name.)

Mumsnet founder Justine Roberts offered hope to parents who feel they made a bad choice when naming their child. Talking with the BBC she said that “most children grow into their names, and those who don’t can always fall back on middle names, nicknames” or in extreme cases, they can go to court and have it legally changed to something they prefer.

The views expressed in this column are not necessarily those of the Courier-Post.