Police standards should protect everyone. Having a use-of-force policy is great, and policies are always “perfect” until the situation goes sideways and officers have to use their judgment to make split second decisions.

Police standards should protect everyone. Having a use-of-force policy is great, and policies are always “perfect” until the situation goes sideways and officers have to use their judgment to make split second decisions. In other words, I don't think having a uniform policy on use of force is the answer to the perceived problem of too many police-involved shootings.

Any death is tragic and there have been a number of shooting where decisions made by police officers, with 20/20 hindsight, were not perfect decisions. But when you consider the number of encounters our police have every day — with felons, gang members, those impaired by substances — the number of police-involved shootings is relatively small.

I don't think many people understand just how dangerous their job is. We seem to be at a point where the press wants to believe officers are wrong and that the person shot was a victim of overly aggressive police. That is rarely the case. I certainly don't want to live in a country without police protecting us. We need to support our police in a more positive manner.

The news media seem to pander to special interest groups. Coverage of issues is so biased that many are just tuning out other voices.

We should be able to get on the same page about supporting our law enforcement personnel and appreciating how dangerous and difficult their job is.

Any use-of-force policy should not make it more dangerous for officers. They are public workers and the rules should not increase the hazard of their job.

— Jess Ornelas, Hannibal