There are people who can watch the goriest of movies, or the 10 p.m. news, jump into bed and then sleep like a baby. Others can watch the “Sound of Music” and be plagued by the most disturbing of nightmares.

There are people who can watch the goriest of movies, or the 10 p.m. news, jump into bed and then sleep like a baby. Others can watch the “Sound of Music” and be plagued by the most disturbing of nightmares.

My slumber was recently haunted after reading a story entitled: The Cost of Weddings in 2017 is Legit Horrifying.

Ordinarily such a story wouldn’t bother me. In fact, I normally wouldn’t even pause to read such an article except for the fact that in just over a month my youngest daughter, Anna, will be getting married. Consequently, an article with such a headline beckoned me to stop and read it, just as one feels compelled to take a good, long look at the scene of a traffic crash, despite one’s best attempts to keep their eyes straight ahead.

The story I found was based on a Real Weddings Study conducted by a wedding planning service, The Knot, which surveyed about 13,000 American couples who were married in 2016.

According to the data that was collected, the average amount spent on a wedding last year was $35,329. That amount represents an increase of almost $3,000 more than the previous year.

The average cost was highest in the state of New York at $78,464. In contrast, the cheapest place on average to “tie the knot” was the state of Arkansas where the figure was $19,522.

According to The Knot, the driving factor behind the cost of a wedding is the venue at $16,107. Next on the list of wedding-related expenses were the engagement ring, $6,163; reception band, $4,156; photographer, $2,783; florist, $2,534; ceremony site, $2,197; wedding event planner, $2,037; videographer, $1,995; wedding dress, $1,564; rehearsal dinner, $1,378; reception deejay, $1,245; transportation, $859; ceremony musicians, $755; wedding cake, $582; invitations, $462; groom’s attire, $280; officiant, $278; favors, $268; wedding day hair styling, $119; wedding day makeup, $100; and catering (price per person), $71.

After reading over the list of average wedding costs and overcoming the subsequent lightheadedness, it occurred to this father of the bride that there is surely a way or two to cut some cost corners. But beyond handing out kazoos to guests in order to save on the cost of music during the reception, I was pretty limited as far as cost-cutting ideas.

Sadly, when it comes to wedding planning I’m a Class A greenhorn. I’ve been in four weddings – my sister’s when I was the cute, little ring bearer, as best man at what was essentially a “shotgun” wedding, as the lucky groom some 41 years ago, and as father of the bride when my daughter, Amber, allowed me to walk her down the aisle five years ago. However, regardless of my role in each production, my part consisted of walking from Point A to Point B and then remaining stationary. The only exception was at my own wedding when I had to remember two important words, “I will,” and say them at the appropriate time time.

Because I wasn’t prepared to rob a bank or sell a kidney, Anna’s wedding fund has consisted of what her mother, Nancy, had socked away. And I can guarantee you what Anna has had to work with as she has planned her wedding is a far, far, far, far, far cry from $35,329. But to her credit Anna has done a wonderful job of staying within her bridal budget.

Although Anna’s wedding may not feature the extravagance of some marital events – (Did you know some weddings feature cigar-rolling stations, photo booths and fireworks?) - it will feature a beautiful bride and a handsome groom who are very much in love. And I can’t help believe that their love is what will ultimately make it a day worth remembering.

The views expressed in this column are not necessarily those of the Courier-Post.