The news coverage of the shooting in the Alexandria, Va., ball park was immediate, though during the first hour was rife with speculation and assumptions by both reporters and news anchors.

The news coverage of the shooting in the Alexandria, Va., ball park was immediate, though during the first hour was rife with speculation and assumptions by both reporters and news anchors. I hesitate to call it accurate. By the time I quit watching NBC coverage, Pete Williams, their justice analyst, had released the name of the shooter before law enforcement of any division had done so. Throughout the coverage, Williams "worked the phones" contacting his sources finding out everything he could about the incident.

Releasing the shooter's name to the public before law enforcement released it could have jeopardized the entire investigation. How did he know if whether or not there were other people, family members, friends, or accomplices, at the shooters residence standing ready to destroy any and all evidence that may be there? They could have been laying a trap for officers who arrived. The zealousness of the press in getting information on breaking news sometimes leads them to make poor decisions about releasing sensitive information.

A CBS reporter at the residence of the shooter said his cameraman saw people going into the house who did not appear to be law enforcement, so obviously someone had access to the house. The reporter went on to say that "minutes later" law enforcement, both local and FBI, appeared and cordoned off the area.

The heroes are the two Capital Police officers who were able to engage the shooter and draw his fire. Both Agent David Bailey and Agent Crystal Griner were reported wounded. Both continued to engage, and after the gunman was down, Agent Bailey came to the outfield to check on Steve Scalise, House GOP Whip (R-La.), where Rep. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Dr. Brad Wenstrup (R-Ohio) tended to Scalise's wounds. Wenstrup is an Iraqi war veteran.

"I felt like I was back in Iraq but without my weapon" he said.

Bailey then went on to check on the well-being of others. 

The shooter was reported being from Belleville, Ill. Rep. Rodney Davis, (R-Ill.) was at the ball field when the shooting took place. Davis made the comment on live TV that "political rhetorical terrorism" is to blame for this and similar incidents.  A foxnews.com report said "The vitriol of political rhetoric has been increasing for years, but has been particularly high under the Trump Administration."

That's not quite right. More accurately, the vitriol of political rhetoric is high because of those who belligerently oppose the Trump Administration.

As I have said, this level of hate and animosity acted out toward an American President has never been seen in recent political history. It goes beyond mere disagreement or dissatisfaction with an elected official. It precludes the capability of even beginning to work together as Americans. If everyone — Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, Constitutionalists — everyone who calls themselves an American, would stop believing we're divided and start working to be united, willing to give and not just take, we would see things change in America for the good of everyone.

House Speaker Paul Ryan asked the House of Representatives to join him to "...resolve to come together. We need to lift each other up, to come together to show the country, to show the world, we are one house, the Peoples house, united in our humanity, and it is that humanity which will win the day, and it always will."

I would add, we need to be united in our humanity praying for God's blessing.

But it's not just up to the President, or Congress, or any other group.  It's up to all of us.  We're all in this together.