Organ music can once again be heard at Trinity — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Fourth Street. The historic church has just completed an 18-month-long restoration project. A Re-Dedication Concert is scheduled to start at 4 p.m. Sunday, June 17.

Organ music can once again be heard at Trinity — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Fourth Street. The historic church has just completed an 18-month-long restoration project. A Re-Dedication Concert is scheduled to start at 4 p.m. Sunday, June 17.

“Our 1929 Kilgen Organ sounds better than ever,” said Trinity’s minister, The Rev’d Dawn-Victoria Mitchell. “At almost ninety years old, it was needing a lot of TLC. Not much had been done since it was first installed except for some routine maintenance and tuning.”

The organ is historic in its own right, Mitchell said. Pipes from the original 1872 organ are included among the working pipes. The restoration project was a huge undertaking and commitment by the congregation.

“The difference between the old organ and our restored organ is night and day,” said Mitchell. “Our organ sounds absolutely heavenly now, thanks to the hard work of Ken and his assistants.”

Work on the organ was carried out by Ken Kavanaugh of Columbia. Ken is no stranger to Kilgen Organs.

He recalled “a very young boy stopping by the Kilgen Organ Factory with his daddy. Pop had Secretarial Clearance right into Mr. Kilgen’s office. So, when I received a request to come to Hannibal and inspect a Kilgen organ my motor was running. Then I got in the car and started it.”

Several area organists, including David Moore and Trinity’s own organist, Hedy Rothfus, will be at the organ bench. There will also be guest organists from Columbia: Dan and Beth Eckles and Dr. Rochelle Parker.

The public in invited to come celebrate this milestone. A light reception will follow in the church’s Guild Hall.