The check is one of four similar checks that have been issued and presented to the commissions of Macon, Marion, Monroe, and Shelby Counties in the same amount as part of the effort to close out the Transportation Development District by June 30.

Although there was no official business on the Marion County Commission's agenda Monday, commissioners welcomed Larry Craig, who came bearing a check for $199,000 made out to the county.

Craig, Executive Director of the US Highway 36 - Interstate 72 Corridor Transportation Development District, gave the check to county treasurer Joelle Fohey as a partial/interim payment of excess funds that is in the possession of the TDD.

The check is one of four similar checks that have been issued and presented to the commissions of Macon, Marion, Monroe, and Shelby Counties in the same amount as part of the effort to close out the Transportation Development District by June 30. Although the four county commissions knew they would receive money from the closure of the TDD, the precise amount was uncertain.

Marion County Presiding Commissioner Lyndon Bode, who also represented the county of the TDD board of directors, said the commission discussed the possible windfall from the TDD dissolution in January during budget time. The commissioners decided to the put the forthcoming money into general revenue and move it into reserve funds for transportation projects as necessary.

“Basically if there's an emergency or something that needs to be funded right away, the money would be there,” Bode said.

As it turns out, something does need to be funded right away: the Taylor Bridge in the northern part of the county. The bridge, at 201 feet long, is the county's longest deficient bridge and was closed on an emergency basis last fall and has remained closed since. The estimated cost to repair the bridge ranges from $1 million to $1.3 million.

Commissioners allocated $300,000 for the project already. The extra $199,000 is expected to give a significant lift to the project.

“It's a great boost there,” Bode said.

The TDD was formed in the 2000s to support widening Highway 36 from Hannibal to Macon. The district finished making its payments in 2017 and subsequently discontinued a voter-approved sales tax earmarked for highway widening on July 31, 2017.

The debts were repaid and sales tax discontinued more than three and half years earlier than originally anticipated. Excess money generated through the sales tax are now being disbursed back to the four participating counties.

Plans are currently under way to have one final TDD board meeting in June to approve resolutions to abolish the District, review and approve all final invoices and request for reimbursements, and then issue one more check to each of the four counties in the district to officially close out the TDD’s checking account.

Reach editor Eric Dundon at eric.dundon@courierpost.com .