The tiny church has raised more than $41,275 to restore elegant stained glass windows on the south and north sides of the sanctuary.

Even some Christians have stopped believing in miracles, but Clarksville United Methodist has visual proof that they can still happen.

The tiny church has raised more than $41,275 to restore elegant stained glass windows on the south and north sides of the sanctuary.

Now, it’s embarking ahead of schedule on the $19,130 upgrading of the east side windows and smaller glass portals in the north side Sunday School room.

In addition to tithes from members and support from area residents, the small congregation has gotten a huge financial boost from its community meals.

The next feast is the annual Eagle Days Homemade Soup Luncheon from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27. The menu features chili or chicken noodle, hot dogs, chili dogs, chips, dessert and beverage. The soup is $3 a bowl, hot dogs $3 and chili dogs $4. Chips and a drink are $1 each and desserts cost $3. Diners may pay at the door.

“We want to provide a warm, inviting place for eagle watchers to come in out of the cold, have a delicious meal and visit with old friends,” said Janie Busch, one of the organizers.  “We look forward to doing it again this year.”

As an example of the selflessness among the congregation, Busch points to longtime member Bobbi Fox, who’s been known to wear a Wonder Woman apron while working at previous events.

“What can you say when she asks ‘How many pies do you want me to make?’” Busch laughed.

The 110-year-old brick and stone church is at the corner of Highway 79 and Howard Street at the four-way stop. The sanctuary is surrounded by intricate colored glass that features Christian symbols, the names of previous pastors and lists of pioneer church members.

The windows campaign began in October 2014. The first phase was completed in 2016 and the second phase in 2017.

Art Glass Unlimited of St. Louis returned Jan. 18 to start the third phase. The congregation already has almost $17,000 of the $19,100 cost. The east window is probably the most visible because it faces the highway.

The tiny parish, which traces its roots to the 1830s, usually has fewer than 15 people at Sunday services. But it doesn’t shy away from big projects. The roof was replaced in 2007, steeple work was done during the building centennial in 2008, and basement and kitchen renovations were completed in 2013.