Before marching into the Marion County Courthouse to watch the Hannibal Board of Public Works' (HBPW) hearing regarding the implementation of the city's chloramine ordinance, many of the same people marched in front of the courthouse holding picket signs.

Before marching into the Marion County Courthouse to watch the Hannibal Board of Public Works’ (HBPW) hearing regarding the implementation of the city’s chloramine ordinance, many of the same people marched in front of the courthouse holding picket signs.

“The bulk of the citizens we’ve talked to, including myself, think that it’s outrageous we’re being sued, the citizens of Hannibal, by the Board of Public Works,” said Denny Kolarik.

Kolarik applauded the city’s efforts to defend Proposition 1 before a judge.

“We wish the city well. The City Council has been very supportive and it’s unfair to them and all the citizens of Hannibal to be sued when they’ve already voted on the issue,” he said. “The issue was whether we wanted ammonia in our water and that issue has done been confirmed. It shouldn’t be a no-win situation. Everybody should get together, bury the hatchet and fix it.

“I don’t care if the Board of Public Works brings the water to us by teaspoon, tablespoon, flask, bucket or tanker truck, they need to get us water without ammonia.”

Sue Conner viewed her protest as standing up for her vote in April.

“I’m here because I voted to get chloramines out of the water,” she said. “We need safe, clean water and it’s no big deal to do that. They (HBPW) said they were going to do it and now they’re suing the city. I hope they change their mind and do what we voted for.”

While not a Hannibal resident, Ed Francis was carrying a picket sign anyway.

“I’m from Ralls County but I’m still concerned about Hannibal and the water it provides for its citizens,” he said.

Would protesting deliver a message?

“I think so,” said Francis. “Someone has to be heard and it’s the public that needs to be heard. We have a problem in Hannibal with water. It’s really sad that everybody has to go out and buy water, so why not have some good water to drink, then we won’t have to worry about buying water.”

“I hope so,” said Conner. “I hope it does something because our vote counts, that’s all, and it (Proposition 1) passed. They (HBPW) don’t want to do it (discontinue use of ammonia) it don’t look like.”

Reach reporter Danny Henley at danny.henley@courierpost.com