Hannibal's Central Park is a busy place from 8 a.m. to noon every Saturday, as farmers and gardeners, along with artisans, gather to sell their fresh veggies, fruit and other items.

Hannibal's Central Park is a busy place from 8 a.m. to noon every Saturday, as farmers and gardeners, along with artisans, gather to sell their fresh veggies, fruit and other items.

On Saturday, July 8, the crowd was also pleased to find freshly-roasted coffee being prepared and served, hot or cold. Tim Fenton of Second Breakfast in Hannibal was assisted by his 7-year-old son, Jonathan, as he brewed the coffee. He was using full city roast coffee beans from Honduras.

Kara Viorel, of Hannibal, with Caroline and Mia Viorel, and Jen Penza of Chicago were among the people enjoying their coffee.

Kayla Murta not only was buying tomatoes, squash and zucchini at the farmers market, she was planning to go to Perry, Mo., and buy day lilies from “the tomato guy from Perry.” With her was Anna Lemon, who said she “really like the flowers” at the farmers market.

One man selling only flowers was Ronnie Truitt of Kirksville, whose hibiscus was his best seller. He has been coming to the Hannibal farmers market for 15 years, explaining, “I sell nothing but perennials. … I grow (everything) a couple years before I sell it. I know if I can't kill it, (it is good enough to sell).”

Steve Huse of Hope Farms from Center, Mo., was selling cucumbers and free range eggs. One customer was Sundee Wilson from San Francisco, who arrived at the farmers market on her bicycle.

Jenny Brokes bought tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers after she and her sister, Stacy Robertson, did yoga and drank coffee.

Robertson called the farmers market “a real asset to the community.. … I love Saturday morning down here, especially the yoga in the park led by Emily Trevathan of Twisted Juniper.” The sisters also do yoga classes at the YMCA of Hannibal.

Matthew Stone of Philadelphia, Mo., was selling his produce, including peppers.

Janice Hubers of Homegrown Garden Goods of Payson, Ill., who has been coming to Hannibal for 10 years, included blackberries at her table.

Caroline Hulse of Rensselaer had two young assistants, her grandchildren Cecelia and Burton Hulse, as she sold flowers. The children were selling their artwork.

James Large was selling bags of new potatoes, and his Yukon Gold was popular. He also sold green tomatoes, zucchini and green beans.

Among the artisans was Sharon Sherwood of La Grange, who brought small wooden toy cars, crocheted items and special crafts. “Today's big seller is pocket purses,” she said. She makes them from blue jean pockets.

One gardener busy explaining how to use her produce was Mary Behrens. As she sold spearmint to Terri Kroeger, she said this is her third year to bring her variety of herbs to the farmers market. She explained, “The Indians used herbs for medicinal as well as cooking. A lot of people can't have sodium, so we cook with herbs. My husband will try everything I cook.”

See photo gallery for more pictures of the farmers market.

Reach reporter Bev Darr at bev.darr@courierpost.com.