The city of Hannibal holds a new distinction, having been recognized as a Certified Local Government 1 Federal Preservation Program Partner.

The city of Hannibal holds a new distinction, having been recognized as a Certified Local Government 1 Federal Preservation Program Partner. The announcement was made Thursday night, July 6, by Mayor James Hark during the rescheduled meeting of the City Council at City Hall.

Hannibal was one of 38 communities to receive the Certified Local Governments (CLG) designation in 2016. Last year's additions raised to 1,966 the number of communities across the country that now participate in the CLG.

“These Certified Local Governments now have access to unique resources to preserve the heritage of their communities and promote local economic growth through tourism to their historical areas,” wrote Stephanie Toothman, associate director of state, tribal, local, plans & grants for the National Park Service.

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. The CLG program was created through amendments to the act in 1980.

In recognition of its selection the city received a certificate.

In other business:

• The City Council received a proposal from the Hannibal Jaycees for the stage structure located at the amphitheater site. The city and Jaycees will negotiate the price.

• J. Mark McManus spoke to the Council regarding graffiti artists.

• Approval was given a resolution authorizing the mayor to sign a service agreement with the Hannibal Nutrition Center in the amount of $18,357 for senior meal and other services.

• A resolution authorizing a quit claim deed to Hannibal Regional Healthcare System, Inc. for the property swap necessary to rebuild Shinn Lane. City Manager Jeff LaGarce stressed that only a “sliver” of property is being exchanged.

• A contract for $27,000 with Don Martin Construction was approved. The payment is for the demolition of houses at 508 Oak St. and 1019 Valley St.

• The purchase of a paint striper from Sherwin Williams was OK'd. The cost of the striper will be $47,391.19, which is below what was budgeted ($60,000).

• Permission was granted for the use of city-owned property, streets closures, and the sale of alcohol during the Big River Steampunk Festival, Sept. 2 through 4, in the downtown area.

 

Reach reporter Danny Henley at danny.henley@courierpost.com