Members of the Palmyra City Council discussed improvements throughout the Flower City during their regular meeting Thursday, July 6, including the first reading for three new bills.

Members of the Palmyra City Council discussed improvements throughout the Flower City during their regular meeting Thursday, July 6, including the first reading for three new bills.

City Attorney Chase Hickman read the bills to the council, which addressed weeds and grass, keeping livestock in city limits and condominium regulations. The council also approved a contract with Klingner and Associates for an upcoming culvert extension on Main St.

The council members agreed that the contract provided a measure of assurance for an upcoming culvert extension project to the east of Main St., which will take care of a collapsed pipe and an eroded ditch. Mayor Loren Graham said he met with State Sen. Brian Munzlinger (R-Williamstown) to request his help on getting the Missouri Department of Transportation to assist with tuckpointing an old brick culvert beneath Main St. Graham said Munzlinger would continue to pursue options — MoDOT maintains Main St., also known as Business 61, but the city maintains the parking spots along the road.

The first bill Hickman read would allow citizens to apply for a permit to bale grass into hay by July 15 each year. They would still receive a letter if grass or vegetation reached a height of 10 inches or more, along with a reminder about the required permit. The second bill would add goats to the list of livestock regulated under the city's ordinances, and the third bill would establish a daily $500 fine for condominium owners who do not adhere to city regulations.

In other business:

Council member Ken Sheputis announced that he and Graham took photographs of building safety issues on the 100 block of Main St. Graham will draft a letter to go with each photograph, so property owners know what they need to do in accordance with the city's dangerous buildings ordinance.

Street Commissioner Lynn Smith requested the purchase of a curb roller for $4,618, noting the machine could be powered by existing department trucks instead of a separate power pack. Smith also requested the purchase of a former Marion County truck, for $16,500 from Quincy Mack. He said he needed an older truck for dumping asphalt chunks and similar work, so the city's newer trucks could be kept in good shape. The council approved both purchase requests, and Smith said the city's 39-year old truck could be sold through sealed bids.

Police Chief Eddie Bogue requested council approval to donate unclaimed bicycles and scooters to Palmyra United Methodist Church, where they could be repaired and donated. He said department officials returned two small bicycles and a scooter following a Facebook post, but no other items have been claimed since.

Bogue also discussed a city ordinance that stipulated any vehicle left in the same spot for more than 48 hours could be towed. Bogue and council members agreed that the 48-hour time frame was restrictive, and Hickman said the ordinance could be rewritten with a different time frame if needed. Bogue emphasized police officers are focusing their efforts on issuing citations for unlicensed, broken-down vehicles in town.

City Clerk Deena Parsons announced the next city council meeting dates with August dates moved to avoid conflicts with the Marion County Fair. The council's next meetings will be Thursday, July 20, Thursday, Aug. 10 and Thursday, Aug. 24.

The council adjourned to a closed executive session to discuss personnel and real estate topics.

Reach reporter Trevor McDonald at trevor.mcdonald@courierpost.com