How far would you drive to safely dispose of your household hazardous waste and electronic devices that are either dead or are no longer wanted? Apparently Perry, Mo., where the Mark Twain Regional Council of Governments (MTRCG) is serving as a drop-off point for both, isn't too far, based on the volume of items that have been dropped off.

How far would you drive to safely dispose of your household hazardous waste and electronic devices that are either dead or are no longer wanted? Apparently Perry, Mo., where the Mark Twain Regional Council of Governments (MTRCG) is serving as a drop-off point for both, isn’t too far, based on the volume of items that have been dropped off.

“It’s been very popular,” said Cindy Hultz, executive director of the MTRCG. “People have cleaned out their barns and garages and have brought stuff in.”

During an appearance last month before the Marion County Commission, Hultz reported that when the contractor came to pick up the e-waste, three trucks couldn’t hold everything.

“They thought they would get it all at one time, but they had to make two more truck loads,” she said.

The most popular e-waste item is the tube-style television.

“We have seen such an abundance of TVs collected. It’s just amazing the amount of TVs,” Hultz told the commissioners. “We knew we were going to get a lot of TVs.”

The fate of the TVs that are dropped off depends on their working condition.

“If they are usable, they will be used for their intended purpose,” said Hultz. “If it can’t be used they’re going to break it down and get the products out that can be recycled.”

The acceptance of e-waste, such as TVs, won’t last forever.

“We have a set amount of grant funding to pay for this and then once we reach that mark we won’t be able to take TVs any more. We’re hoping to get a lot of them out of the way,” said Hultz.

According to Hultz, approximately $65,000 is left of the grant money that was secured through the Mark Twain Solid Waste Management District.

Personal privacy is taken into consideration when items such as computers are dropped off.

“If somebody brings a computer to us we assure them those stay locked in that container until the contractor picks them up and then they have to take them to a locked facility. It will stay there until the hard drive inside that computer is shredded,” said Hultz.

Qualifying as e-waste is “anything that has had a circuit going through it, or which comes with a (power) cord,” Hultz told the commissioners. Among the household hazardous waste that will be accepted are paint, used motor oil and pesticides.

Items are accepted at the MTRCG, 42494 Delaware Lane, Perry, every Wednesday and the first Saturday of every month from 9 a.m. to noon.

“It’s been so needed,” said Hultz.

Reach reporter Danny Henley at danny.henley@courierpost.com