In mid-March, the Starbuck Wildfire started in Oklahoma, danced across the Kanas border bearing down on Clark County, Kan., and eventually cut a path of destruction that destroyed 800,000 acres of mostly ranch land in the two states.

In mid-March, the Starbuck Wildfire started in Oklahoma, danced across the Kanas border bearing down on Clark County, Kan., and eventually cut a path of destruction that destroyed 800,000 acres of mostly ranch land in the two states.

By far, the largest extent of damage was in Clark County, where 85 percent of the ranchland was left as a smoldering wasteland.

What took generations to build was wiped out in a matter of days.

“It was devastating,” said Bernie Smith, fire chief of Ingalls, Kan., population about 300. Smith owns ranchland in just across the state line in Beaver County, Okla., and in Clark County.

Over the Memorial Day weekend, Monroe County volunteers delivered more than 24,000 pounds of materials to help with the reconstruction of ranch infrastructure in Clark County.

The drive to provide donations to the devastated ranchers and workers in Kansas was spear-headed by the Paris Loin’s Club, the Midway Christian Church, Santa Fe Christian Church and individuals. Supplies were delivered to the Coop in Paris and to Wheeler Auction on U.S. 24. On Friday, volunteers gathered at Wheeler Auction to load the donations on to two flat-bed trailers.

Charlie Rosenkrans, secretary of the Paris Loins Club, said when he saw the devastating effects of the wildfire on Kansas, he knew the club had to spring into action.

“This year’s Loin’s Club international meet will be in Chicago, where we were founded 100 years ago,” he said. “And this fits with what the Loins are about – where there is a need, there is a Loin. This is definitely a need. There were people left with nothing – and seven people died.”

Donations include enough barbed wire and posts to replace some three miles of fencing, and at $9,000 a mile to replace the fencing, that is needed assistance, said Smith.

Mary Beth Ray and her son, Scott, along with Lonnie Wolfe and his wife, Terry, spent Friday night and Saturday driving the supplies to meet Smith in Ingalls.

“Please tell the people of Missouri how much we appreciate them,” Smith said during a telephone interview on Friday.