The Paris Board of Aldermen gave preliminary approval during its monthly meeting for a Paris property owner to rezone nearly 25 acres in the city from residential to agricultural use.

The Paris Board of Aldermen gave preliminary approval during its monthly meeting for a Paris property owner to rezone nearly 25 acres in the city from residential to agricultural use.

That means Quentin Ashenfelter and his family are a step closer to building a four-bedroom, one-and-half-bath house on the property, and have the flexibility to have more chickens than city ordinances allow, and to have goats for his daughters to raise for 4-H competitions.

Ashenfelter wants to have more than the 12 chickens allowed on property blocks zoned residential, and he wants to possibly have “a couple of bottle calves that would be raised for themselves,” as well as goats for his daughters’ 4-H projects and to help keep vegetation overgrowth in check.

Aldermen were told that at a Paris Planning and Zoning Board meeting to discuss the project, members were informed that no complaints about the project had been received by the city since it was advertised as a legal notice and as neighbors learned of the project from news reports.

The Planning and Zoning Board voted 4-0 to recommend the project to the Board of Aldermen. Neighbors attended the zoning meeting to support the rezoning.

“Jody Hartgrove stated that she is a neighbor to the property and she had no problem with the zoning request,” wrote the zoning board in its report recommending the request. “She went on to say that she wouldn’t be able to hear or see anything from the location that Quentin is planning to put the chickens and goats.”

Neighbor Paul Allgood also supported the project, and zoning board member Cathy Herron said that she had talked to other neighbors who did not object to the request.

Ashenfelter told the planning and zoning board that he plans to erect a fence with padlocks on the gates.

The Aldermen voted 4-0 to accept the recommendation of Mayor James Buckman and the Planning and Zoning Board to approve Ashenfelter’s request. The city attorney will now daft and ordinance for the June Board of Aldermen meeting, which the board needs to approve to make the official change in city zoning.

“Our family is very happy that the girls can do 4-H projects on their own property,” said Ashenfelter following the preliminary approval by the board. “And a special thank-you to Scott and Anna Willingham for letting is bring our animals to their property during all the rezoning.”