As part of the major switch to a self-managed power plan, the BPW has engaged in exploring multiple means to power Hannibal and reach its capacity.

New power responsibilities will be shouldered by the Hannibal Board of Public Works beginning next June, after its current power supply contract expires with Dynegy, a Texas utility doing business through a subsidiary called Illinois Power Marketing.

Capacity, among other things, represents a community's potential energy reserves. In Hannibal's case, under its Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) obligation, the BPW must own or control enough capacity to cover its own peak load, plus 7.5 percent, which next year will amount to about 63 MW (megawatts).

As part of the major switch to a self-managed power plan, the BPW has engaged in exploring multiple means to power Hannibal and reach its capacity.

This series outlines the various forays into power options the BPW has so far explored.

Part 1: The move to diversify

Part 2: ‘Clean’ energy options

Part 3: Prairie State’s role

Part 4: Delving into diesel

Part 5: Thinking outside the box