Beth Haven Nursing Home in Hannibal was recognized by the Missouri Local Area Network for Excellence (MoLANE) for their low rates of antipsychotic use.

The National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care seeks to optimize the quality of life for residents in America’s nursing homes by improving care for all residents, especially those with dementia. Critical to nursing home residents’ quality of life is eliminating the inappropriate use of antipsychotic medications, especially when trying to control the behavioral symptoms of dementia. In 2012, the Partnership, a public-private coalition, established a national goal of reducing the use of antipsychotic medications in nursing home residents and using other approaches that are safer and more effective. The Partnership includes the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), nursing home residents and their family members, advocacy organizations, providers and professional associations. Each state also has a coalition of stakeholders, referred to as Local Area Networks for Excellence (LANE), promoting this goal locally.

In the last quarter of 2011, almost 1 in four nursing home residents (23.9 percent) were receiving an antipsychotic medication. Since then there has been a decrease of 35 percent to a national prevalence of 15.5 percent in the second quarter of 2017. Many nursing homes worked diligently to individualize care for every nursing home resident thereby lowering their use of inappropriate antipsychotics. Other homes had low rates in the beginning and have maintained these rates and shared their approaches.

Beth Haven Nursing Home in Hannibal was recognized by the Missouri Local Area Network for Excellence (MoLANE) for their low rates of antipsychotic use.

“When we encounter nursing home residents with dementia who we fear may harm themselves or others, we do not automatically assume that the use of antipsychotic drugs is the answer. We know that the key is understanding the motivations behind their behavior and attempting to meet those needs or fears without the use of unnecessary drugs,” said Paul Ewert, Beth Haven CEO. “We believe in a person centered approach.”