Hannibal will be forever linked to a man known for his writing, rather than his participation in the Civil War. Hannibal's connection to the “war between the states” will be better known in the future, thanks to the City Council's recent decision to partner with the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation.

Hannibal will be forever linked to a man known for his writing, rather than his participation in the Civil War. Hannibal’s connection to the “war between the states” will be better known in the future, thanks to the City Council’s recent decision to partner with the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation.

The City Council agreed earlier this month to make a $1,000 match toward the purchase of a $2,500 blue highway sign indicating that the community is one of a series U.S. Grant Trails in Missouri.

“It’s a nice historical marker and will be placed on our property, for our use. They have been gracious enough to include Hannibal on the U.S. Grant Trail, provide the highway sign, provide us with U.S. Grant Trail brochure/maps for public use,” noted City Manager Jeff LaGarce in a memo to the Council.

According to LaGarce, a sign will likely be installed in the historic district at the corner of Third and North streets.

The Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation, a 501c3 not-for-profit organization that is run by volunteers, has also designed an informational sign for mounting at the Old Baptist Cemetery in Hannibal, where Civil War soldiers are buried.

LaGarce, who noted that Missouri had the second largest number of battles during Civil War, suggested to the Council that the addition of Hannibal to Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation’s brochures/maps could open the door to additional visitors whose interest in Mark Twain may be fleeting at most.

“It’s another target market of tourism,” he said. “This organization is really putting the Civil War on Missouri’s map, and we’re fortunate to be included.”

Among the Missouri communities already listed on the U.S. Grant Trails are Fulton, Centralia, Mexico, Booneville and Cape Girardeau.

While Samuel Clemens’ Civil War participation was reportedly limited to a two-week stint as a member of a Confederate militia, he wound up a close friend of a man whose name will always be recognized as someone who played a pivotal role in the war’s outcome — Ulysses S. Grant.

Grant’s autobiography, written as he was dying of cancer in 1885, was published as a two-volume set by Mark Twain shortly after Grant’s death. Grant’s memoirs made approximately $450,000 for his family, leaving it financially secure.