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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Council seeks sweet solution to sewer complaint

  • Harold Lain of Hannibal is one of the property owners whose sewer line connects to a storm sewer, rather than the sanitary sewer line which runs past his Grand Avenue home. On Tuesday night he appeared before the City Council to express his displeasure that he is expected to cover the expense of the sewer-line switch.
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  • Harold Lain of Hannibal is one of the property owners whose sewer line connects to a storm sewer, rather than the sanitary sewer line which runs past his Grand Avenue home. On Tuesday night he appeared before the City Council to express his displeasure that he is expected to cover the expense of the sewer-line switch.
    “I don’t feel I’m responsible,” said the 72-year-old, who questioned why the problem wasn’t addressed during the Grand Avenue project a few years ago.
    Heath Hall, director of operations for the Board of Public Works, said the BPW wasn’t looking for illegal connections during the project, even though it discovered and dealt with a couple. It was also pointed out that Lain’s property was just outside the project area.
    Lain interprets the BPW’s willingness to refund five years of sewer payments as an admission of “some guilt.” City Manager Jeff LaGarce refuted that contention, stating the BPW’s refund offer was not an admission of any kind, but simply an effort to do “something nice.”
    Lain, who says he has been paying utilities in Hannibal for 52 years, asked why he was only eligible for a five-year rebate. According to law, the BPW is only required to keep customer records for five years.
    Hall reported the BPW is willing to allow Lain’s sewer lateral to go into a manhole to help save on cost. LaGarce added that the city, rather than Lain, would be responsible for the cost of any street work that will be required to make the connection.
    Hall speculated that when those factors are taken into consideration, plus the five-year sewer rebate, it should be close to covering the cost of the project.
    “This could be a non-issue,” said Mayor Pro Tem Kevin Knickerbocker.
    In other business:
    • Approval was given to accept a bid from a state contractor – Lou Fusz Ford – to supply 11 police package vehicles. The purchase price after trade-ins and the down payment will leave a balance of $264,800. The vehicles would be purchased utilizing a lease agreement. That agreement would have a total of three annual payments with the first payment due in the fall of 2015.
    • A number of items were declared as surplus and will be up for sale during the city’s auction on Saturday, Sept. 27. The event will begin at 10 a.m. at the Street Department on Warren Barrett Drive.
    • Approval was given to hiring Yancey Auction Services to conduct the city auction. Former Mayor John Yancey will provide auctioneering services at no cost to the city.
    Page 2 of 2 - • The Council took no action on two Traffic Committee recommendations, thus approving them. One will see the permanent of closure of Lemon Street, south of Gordon Street, and Wardlaw east of South Arch. Also OK’d was putting up signage prohibiting tractor-trailers from New London Gravel and Orchard.
    • A property tax levy public hearing was scheduled for 6:45 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 2.
    • The use of downtown city streets and parking lots was approved for use during the annual Twain on Main event over Memorial Day weekend in 2015.
    • The following park board appointments were approved: Jeriod Turner, appointed for a term to expire in July 2017; Tom Batenhorst, appointed for an unexpired term to expire in July 2016.

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