|
|
Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Water system repair costs increase

  • There’s good news and bad news regarding the costs associated with the city of Hannibal’s late June water system emergency. The bad news: At last check the estimate was double what was initially announced. The good news: Insurance is picking up virtually all the expense.
    • email print
      Comment
  • There’s good news and bad news regarding the costs associated with the city of Hannibal’s late June water system emergency. The bad news: At last check the estimate was double what was initially announced. The good news: Insurance is picking up virtually all the expense.
    A preliminary estimate of $150,000 was given by Bob Stevenson, general manager of the Board of Public Works, just a handful of days after the event, which saw the Water Filter Plant in Riverview Park flood after reportedly a lightning strike caused a large valve to open. In all fairness to Stevenson that figure was offered just as BPW personnel were beginning the process of evaluating what of the equipment that went under water on June 22 could be salvaged and what would have to be replaced.
    During last month’s meeting of the BPW Board, Heath Hall, director of operations for the BPW, advised that the figure was “$215,000 and counting,” explaining that bills from a few contractors had not yet been received. He added that the final cost “will probably approach $300,000.”
    “So far our insurance company (MIRMA) appears to be covering all the damage. We may have to pay for any upgrades to the equipment, but MIRMA should cover any direct replacements,” said Hall.
    The BPW’s insurance deductible is a “pretty modest” $1,000, reported Stevenson.
    In addition to the cost of damaged equipment, MIRMA will also pick up some of the labor costs associated with the incident. According to Stevenson, MIRMA won’t pay for “straight time” that was incurred at the plant during and after the emergency, but will help with the cost of “contract labor” and overtime expenses.
    Hall added that the insurance provider might also cover a percentage of any preventative measures the BPW chooses to take to keep such an occurrence from happening again.
    Hall told the Board that a lot of lessons could be learned from the event.
    “We have begun discussions on prevention methods. We have several ideas we are deliberating right now,” he said, adding that none of the preventative steps under consideration are in the current budget.
    One of the preventative measures being discussed is the addition of more lightning protection at the water plant.
    The Water Filter Plant was knocked out of service after a 24-inch electric actuated butterfly valve in the basement of the building opened when it should not have. A 6-inch floor drain in the basement could not keep up with the volume of water that was flowing back into the building from a 2.5 million gallon storage tank.
    Hall told the Board there are dozens of other pipes in the building, ranging from 24 to 30 inches, that have the potential of causing another flood should a valve fail.
    Page 2 of 2 - “With pipes that size it doesn’t take long for water to back up,” said Hall.
    The possibility of adding a larger capacity drain was suggested. Stevenson said taking such a step would be a challenge because of the number of pipes already underground at the Water Filter Plant.

        calendar