|
|
Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • nMiniature but Mighty,’ New art exhibit opens at HAC

  • Marsha McHatton’s large paintings of camellias and other flowers contrasted with tiny pictures painted by several local artists at the new Miniature but Mighty art exhibit that opened Saturday, July 12, at the Hannibal Arts Council.
    • email print
      Comment
  •  
     
     
     
    Marsha McHatton’s large paintings of camellias and other flowers contrasted with tiny pictures painted by several local artists at the new Miniature but Mighty art exhibit that opened Saturday, July 12, at the Hannibal Arts Council.
    McHatton brought her floral pictures from Holt, Mich., and made her Hannibal debut. She is a native of Jacksonville, Ill., and was excited to be participating in Hannibal’s active arts community.
    Her Camellias in Glass Bowl is a award winner that earned her a second place prize at the Illinois State Fair.
    As he viewed McHatton’s pictures, artist of miniatures David Maas of Quincy, Ill., said, “We have a lot in common (except for the size of their pictures). We both like flowers.”
    Maas’ art also is available a Gallery 310 at 310 North Main in Hannibal.
    Among the artists featured at the new exhibit are Wes and Rachelle Siegrist of Townsend, Tenn., painters of American miniatures.
    Tara Jacobs, who teaches art at Veterans Elementary School in Hannibal, contributed four tiny photographs titled Itsy Bitsy Pics.
    Jacobs enjoys all art forms and said, “I love getting students to do all sorts of mediums.”
    Another artist of miniatures was Milly Johnson, whose Wildflower acrylic included a message, “Life is about using a whole box of crayons.”
    Mixed media was used by Greg Celenze for his miniature titled Flying Angel Ascending.
    Others used fiber, including Ann Frye of Hannibal for her Bluebelles.
    Debra K. Scoggin-Myers of Ewing brought several miniatures, including a snail picture titled Home Sweet Home and a house titled Home Is Where the Heart Is.
    Local artist Bob Hoke also contributed miniatures. One face is titled Spy Boy. It represents someone who is in Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans.
    Another local artist known for her talent is Pat Kerns, who exhibited small pictures of irises and yellow roses.
    The exhibit, which is free and open to the public, will continue through Saturday, Aug. 9.
    Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The HAC is closed on Tuesday and Sunday.
    More about the HAC is availalble at www.hannibalarts.com.
    For more pictures, see Seen on Scene photo gallery.

        calendar