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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Canadian couple says river is ‘pretty impressive’

  • As the Mississippi River reached a crest of 26.7 feet on Tuesday, locals and visitors alike could be seen hiking up the flood levee in order to take a good, long look at all the water just east of the flood wall.
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  • As the Mississippi River reached a crest of 26.7 feet on Tuesday, locals and visitors alike could be seen hiking up the flood levee in order to take a good, long look at all the water just east of the flood wall.
    Possibly coming the farthest to catch a glimpse of the muddy water was a couple from Montreal, Canada. Gen Lengevin and Max Belletier were bound for La Plata when they decided to stop off in Hannibal.
    “It’s pretty impressive. We weren’t expecting to look at a flood actually,” said Lengevin.
    Like many visitors to America’s Hometown, the couple was looking for a picturesque spot from which to view the river.
    “Max likes to take pictures and he wants to have the Mississippi, so we were trying to find a nice point of view,” said Lengevin.
    While some people enjoy the opportunity to see the river out of its banks, Belletier, a photographer and videographer, was a bit disappointed.
    “It’s not really what I was looking for. I was looking for something more like a usual landscape you would see being here,” he said.
    Although not exactly what he wanted to shoot, Belletier could still appreciate the river’s raw power on display.
    “It’s nature, something you cannot control, right? It’s actually beautiful in some kind of way, but pretty impressive, that’s for sure,” he said.
    A bit further south on the levee were Terri Nemer of Kansas City and David Klassen of Hannibal.
    Nemer was in Hannibal less than a month ago and saw the river then.
    “We were here two weeks ago and enjoyed a thunderstorm. We took shelter in that pavilion over there,” she said, referring to the green-roofed riverfront overlook. “It’s had a change in two weeks. It’s mighty.”
    Being a resident of Hannibal, Klassen is no stranger to floods.
    “It is fascinating to me to see it in all stages, really, but when it does this it is especially impressive,” he said.
    Atop the section of levee between Broadway and Center Street was Joshua Ketterman of Hannibal. He was seated on the edge of a flower planter, soaking in the scene.
    “I like it,” he said when asked about the river. “It would be a good day to take a boat ride.”
    Ketterman, who has seen floods in other communities, took the spectacle in stride.
    “It’s a natural occurrence. It happens worldwide,” he said. “People either learn to live with it or move away from it, one of the two. There’s no taming Mother Nature.”
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