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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • City asked to repair Broadway buildings

  • An attorney representing an owner of a Broadway building the city has declared must be stabilized is calling on city fathers to pay for the work that is needed.
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  • An attorney representing an owner of a Broadway building the city has declared must be stabilized is calling on city fathers to pay for the work that is needed. The matter was a point of discussion during the closed session part of Tuesday night’s Hannibal City Council meeting.
    City Attorney James Lemon acknowledged that the city has received a “demand” letter from the legal representative of one of two owners of buildings in the 200 block of Broadway concerning repair work an engineer’s report says is needed to stabilize the structures.
    “We have one or two unhappy property owners,” said Lemon. “One of them believes the city is liable to fix the buildings.”
    Lemon’s recommendation to the Council was that the matter should be forwarded to the city’s insurer, the Missouri Intergovernmental Risk Management Association, before taking any action.
    In mid June the city’s building inspector sent letters to Cindy and Rodney Benjamin, who own 211 Broadway, and George and Ilene Dodge, the owners of 209 Broadway, informing them that the buildings need to be vacated until the structures were stabilized. The building owners were given 45 days to undertake the stabilization work.
    Reportedly, Benjamin’s B&B Cut & Style Hair Care shop has not operated in the 211 Broadway building since the demolition of 213 Broadway started in January of this year.
    As for the Vac-Shack, which is the tenant at 209 Broadway, it could not be determined if the shop is still being used as that business’ base of operations since it is not typically open on Thursdays.
    The city had 213 Broadway removed because it partially collapsed and was structurally unstable. Before 213 Broadway was demolished, two plywood shear walls were added on the second floor of 211 Broadway. In addition, multiple anchors were installed through the west wall of 211 Broadway at the roof and the second floor level.
    The stabilization work at 211 Broadway, which cost $38,584, was paid for by the city.
    Quoting Alan Lukens of Klingner & Associates, who performed the latest engineer’s report on the buildings in mid-March of this year, Building Inspector Joey Burnham said the removal of 213 Broadway did not contributed to the problems being experienced at 211 and 209 Broadway.
    Lukens’ report stated that “unless adequate framing and repairs are installed (inside 209 Broadway)” the building is “structurally unsound and at risk of collapse.”
    As for 211 Broadway, the report noted that its “entire two-story wall is excessively leaning and bowing westward” making it “structurally unsound and at risk of collapse.”

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