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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Local landmark: Sixth Street house nears historic status

  • Another Hannibal property will soon hold the designation of “Individual Local Historic Landmark.” On Tuesday night the Hannibal City Council gave first reading to a bill declaring 311 N. Sixth St. a local landmark.
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  • Another Hannibal property will soon hold the designation of “Individual Local Historic Landmark.” On Tuesday night the Hannibal City Council gave first reading to a bill declaring 311 N. Sixth St. a local landmark.
    To reach this point, property owners Clark and Maria Cruikshank had to clear some hurdles. On April 28 the Historic District Development Commission recommended the petition be heard by the Planning and Zoning Commissioners at their monthly
    meeting. On May 15, Planning and Zoning gave a favorable recommendation to the petition and sent it to the City Council for approval.
    To be considered for Individual Local Historic Landmark status a property, site or object must qualify in at least one of four areas of significance:
    • Must be 50 years or older.
    • Must be associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the history of Hannibal.
    • Must be associated with the lives of significant Hannibal persons.
    • Must embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period or method of construction; that represent the work of a master; that possess high artistic values; or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity recognized by the community as historically significant.
    The Cruikshanks contend in their Individual Local Historic Landmark application that the house qualifies under three of the four definitions:
    • The house is over 50 years old having been constructed in 1900.
    • The house’s second owner, Wilson B. Pettibone, was a prominent citizen with the Hannibal Lime Company and Hannibal Sawmill Company. Pettibone donated to the city approximately 465 acres of land for the creation of Riverview Park. He also made donations to the Laura Jones Pettibone School.
    • The house was one of the first examples in the Hannibal Central Park National Historic District where brick was laid using “butter” joints. That English technique of laying brick used a very thin, 3/16-inch wide mortar joint. Reportedly such a technique was expensive as it took more brick plus very skilled masons.
    Reportedly the house was built on the site of the Joseph Dudding house (1853). Dudding’s wife sold the property to John E. Jones in 1898. The property passed to Pettibone, Jones’ brother-in-law, in 1932 and remained in Pettibone’s estate until his death in 1946.
    According to a history summary of the site, the house remains as it was built originally with the exception of a wheelchair ramp that will eventually be removed.

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