Champoo is adapting admirably to nursery life. Here she is taking a break from her ramblings with the cart that Ken made her. Notice the box of belongings, which includes about a dozen dolls and drawing materials.


Soon, however, it will be back to work. Champoo has already 1) run the till 2) prepared several planters of her own design, several of which have sold (She grabbed me to show the price tag stuck in one of her pots. "Not enough money!" she protested. It was priced $64.99.) and made hundreds of boxes. Yesterday, a customer brought back a small dead tree for a replacement. Champoo watched the scene, got an interpretation in Thai from her mom, announced that she did not believe the tree had "d-i-e" (Kae spells out "die" to distinguish it from a homonym in Thai, and now Champoo does the same) and went out back to plant the tree in a pot to prove her point. If it grows, I suspect she will confront the customer the next time she sees him. Yesterday, she found a wilted plant in the greenhouse, brought it up front with much fanfare and watered it in the lunchroom--I suspect to demonstrate to those present that a plant had been missed, which happens when it is in the 80s outside. 


Yesterday was the busiest weekday in the nursery's history. Champoo predicted a busy day the other day: "Today, many customer!"


She is a businesswoman, like her mother. And she is soaking up English like a sponge. 



 

Champoo is adapting admirably to nursery life. Here she is taking a break from her ramblings with the cart that Ken made her. Notice the box of belongings, which includes about a dozen dolls and drawing materials.

Soon, however, it will be back to work. Champoo has already 1) run the till 2) prepared several planters of her own design, several of which have sold (She grabbed me to show the price tag stuck in one of her pots. "Not enough money!" she protested. It was priced $64.99.) and made hundreds of boxes. Yesterday, a customer brought back a small dead tree for a replacement. Champoo watched the scene, got an interpretation in Thai from her mom, announced that she did not believe the tree had "d-i-e" (Kae spells out "die" to distinguish it from a homonym in Thai, and now Champoo does the same) and went out back to plant the tree in a pot to prove her point. If it grows, I suspect she will confront the customer the next time she sees him. Yesterday, she found a wilted plant in the greenhouse, brought it up front with much fanfare and watered it in the lunchroom--I suspect to demonstrate to those present that a plant had been missed, which happens when it is in the 80s outside. 

Yesterday was the busiest weekday in the nursery's history. Champoo predicted a busy day the other day: "Today, many customer!"

She is a businesswoman, like her mother. And she is soaking up English like a sponge.