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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Tip leads authorities to stolen transformers

  • Just hours after the theft of two Hannibal Board of Public Works transformers was reported by the Courier-Post, both devices were recovered.
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  • Just hours after the theft of two Hannibal Board of Public Works transformers was reported by the Courier-Post, both devices were recovered.
    Cindy Livesay, public relations coordinator for the BPW, reports that information regarding the transformers was provided the BPW around noon Tuesday.
    “We received an anonymous tip today that said they had seen the transformers at a certain location,” said Livesay. “We did send somebody out there along with local law enforcement and they did confirm the two transformers were at this location.”
    The spot where the transformers were recovered is not being made public at this point.
    “We’re still working with law enforcement before they can release any details,” said Livesay.
    One of the transformers had already been gutted of recyclable materials.
    “It looks like one of them had all of the metal parts taken out which basically is where the money is, inside of those,” said Livesay. “The second one’s top was missing, but there was nothing taken out of the middle of that one.”
    At least one of the two transformers might still be usable.
    “We’re going to assess the one with the top off and see what’s inside,” said Livesay. “The one they took the metal parts out of is not worth anything any more, unfortunately.”
    The two transformers - a 500 kilo volt-amps (kVA) and a 750 kVA – had been taken from the north parking lot at the former St. Elizabeth Hospital at 109 Virginia St.
    Neither of the devices was energized at the time of the theft.
    Jared Stewart, electric line superintendent for the BPW, estimated that the replacement cost of the 500 kVA transformer was $10,000 and $15,000 for the 750 kVA transformer.
    Because of the size and weight of the transformers, it is estimated that a truck with some type of wench was needed to load the devices.
    In stealing one of the transformers, thieves spilled the oil it contained. Heath Hall, director of operations for the BPW, said the oil was tested to ensure it contained no cancer-causing Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). Otherwise a costly and extensive cleanup would have been required.
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