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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Parks Department out to learn what’s wrong with pool

  • It’s been a decade since the Hannibal Parks & Recreation Department invested just under $1.4 million to convert the city’s pool into an aquatic center. Another sizeable investment may be looming in order to fix what currently ails the facility.
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  • It’s been a decade since the Hannibal Parks & Recreation Department invested just under $1.4 million to convert the city’s pool into an aquatic center. Another sizeable investment may be looming in order to fix what currently ails the facility.
    “This (2003) project included the addition of three slides, spray features, a pump house for the new equipment, a bathhouse renovation plus many other additional amenities,” said Andy Dorian, director of the Parks Department, in a memo to the City Council. “Unfortunately, due to costs, the project did not include renovation to the pipes, filter system or pool basin. The pipes, filter system and pool basin are original from the early 1960s and are at the end of their useful life.”
    Dorian presented a list of concerns regarding the aquatic center, not the least of which is a persistent leak.
    “The pool is leaking a significant amount of water on a daily basis which is an enormous drain on our utility and chemical expenses,” said Dorian, adding that in the last week the pool has lost “several feet of water.” “We can’t find out where it (water) is going.”
    Dorian warns of a “catastrophic failure” of the pool’s pipe system.
    “Any failure of the pipe system would result in the closure of the pool and could result in serious injury to anyone in the pump room,” he said, admitting he’s nervous whenever he’s in the pump room.
    To help determine the problems and solutions, the Council OK’d the Parks Department’s plans to hire an engineering firm to conduct a full analysis of the facility.
    Poepping, Stone, Bach & Associates, Inc., and Waters Edge Design were approved to perform the work for a fee of not more than $30,000. The Parks Department had budgeted $75,000 for the study.
    Dorian anticipates having a report in hand by the first of the year.
    “We will then review the information and decide on what options are best for the Parks Department and city,” he said.

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