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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • Artists explain what inspires them

  • Artists in the “Out-Of-Towners” exhibit and the 2012 Originale winners exhibit at the Aug. 16 opening reception at the Hannibal Arts Council shared their experiences and challenged others to pursue their artistic dreams.
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  • Artists in the “Out-Of-Towners” exhibit and the 2012 Originale winners exhibit at the Aug. 16 opening reception at the Hannibal Arts Council shared their experiences and challenged others to pursue their artistic dreams.
    Craig Norton of Perry said, “15 years ago I felt led as a Christian (to become an artist). God gives us all gifts, and you really need to use them.”
    His work on display included a large car with two occupants, whom he said were his grandmother and one of his three daughters. The car represented the freedom to drive, which older people eventually lose. Norton has shown his work in other states, and two years ago was featured in a New York Times article.
    John Bartz III of Maywood said he was formerly a graphic artist, then began experimenting with paints. When he enrolled in art school, he was inspired by other artists and “I started to create tools.” His large pictures in the current exhibit are from his series “Pathways and Connections.”
    Norton and Bartz were among seven artists featured in the new exhibit, which HAC Executive Director Michael Gaines explained is for artists with any zip codes except Hannibal’s.
    The additional out-of-towners were Daniel (Eric) Phillips of Plevna, Todd Wiseman of Quincy, Ann Titus of Quincy, Joe Conover of Quincy, and Sylvana Purcell of Quincy.
    Also on exhibit are the works of Jason Mejer and Robin Johnson, winners of the HAC’s 2012 Originale show and competition.
    Johnson’s lion picture, “King,” was her winning entry. She explained the lion could represent God, because “like God, he has an awesome fierceness and also is kind, and you can approach him with respect.”
    She named one of her pictures “Sneaky Snow Leopard” because it was painted from a photo she took of a leopard in the Denver zoo, “and he was sneaking over a log.”
    Todd Wiseman paints large pictures of food and other items, including animals. Two of his works were hanging together and composed a face. They were titled “Lips” and “Amber.”  Why are these his choices? “I like to think that someone will put it in their house. I’d like to see it hanging there.”
    Among the people who attended the reception to view the art was Judy Barnes, who explained she enjoyed it all and especially Eric Phillips’ big three-panel fibre art.
    The show will continue until Sept. 14 at the HAC, 105 S. Main in Hannibal. The HAC is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. It is closed on Tuesday and Sunday.
    Page 2 of 2 - For more pictures of the exhibit, see photo gallery.

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