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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
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BAGUETTES AND ONIONS
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About this blog
By Linda Bassett
Author and culinary school teacher Linda Bassett provides recipes for and tips on the season's freshest ingredients. She is the author of \x34From Apple Pie to Pad Thai: Neighborhood Cooking North of Boston.\x34 Reach her by email at KitchenCall@aol. ...
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Kitchen Call
Author and culinary school teacher Linda Bassett provides recipes for and tips on the season's freshest ingredients. She is the author of \x34From Apple Pie to Pad Thai: Neighborhood Cooking North of Boston.\x34 Reach her by email at KitchenCall@aol.com.
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By lindabcooks
June 12, 2013 5:15 p.m.



Another day, well, really, late night in Paris.  And still thinking about what happens to all that bread in a city where FRESH is the watchword.  Au Pied de Cochon (it means “the pig’s foot”), provided another answer.  Onion soup!  Hot and soothing and topped with thick slices of yesterday’s baguette and grated cheese.  Not to mention the meltingly tender onions at the bottom of the bowl.

Popular for decades, this restaurant packs them in every night.  More so after 10 o’clock as it never closes.  Never.  This brasserie is still hopping after all the other venues close.  So, for anyone who’s been partying until the wee hours, this is the place to go to finish off the evening – even at 3:00 AM.  And the place to go when it’s still raining in Paris.  Still.

ONION SOUP, AU PIED DE COCHON

Makes 6 servings, easily doubled

My advice on this one is to get a nice sturdy ovenproof roasting pan, like one of those turkey pans with handles, to put the bowls into for the broiling step.  That way,  soup won’t slosh on the bottom of the oven or on your floor, or burn your hands as you try to transfer it to the table at the perfect temperature – hot, hot, hot!

The chicken stock, rather than beef, was a bit of a shock to me, but some cooks outside the restaurant make it with half chicken, half beef stock.  After tasting the original, I’ll stick to this recipe.

1 or 2 large white onions, weight about 1 pound, thinly sliced

2 cups dry white wine

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

6 cups chicken stock

6 thick slices “day old” crusty baguette

2 cups grated Gruyere cheese



  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.


  • Combine the onions, wine, and butter in a baking dish.  Cook, uncovered until the onion is very soft and most of the liquid evaporates, about 45 minutes.  Raise the oven temperature to broil.


  • While the onion cooks, bring stock to a simmer in a large, heavy saucepan.


  •  Distribute the cooked onions evenly into 6 deep, ovenproof soup bowls.  Pour the simmering stock into each one.  Place a round of bread on top of each soup bowl; top the bread with the grated cheese.


  • Transfer the soup bowls to the oven, under the broiler, for 2 to 3 minutes, until cheese melts.  Serve immediately.




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