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Hannibal Courier - Post - Hannibal, MO
  • PULSE: Boston Marathon bombings, a month of tragedy, resolve

  • One month ago today, twin blasts rang out at one of America's greatest athletic traditions, the Boston Marathon. Three people were killed, hundreds wounded, and the manhunt for one of the suspects froze an entire city for almost a whole day. Today, PULSE looks back at the tragic event, and looks forward at a changed Ameri...
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  • One month ago today, twin blasts rang out at one of America's greatest athletic traditions, the Boston Marathon. Three people were killed, hundreds wounded, and the manhunt for one of the suspects froze an entire city for almost a whole day. Today, PULSE looks back at the tragic event, and looks forward at a changed America, a long road to recovery for many who lost limbs, and what it will take for us to move on, while always remembering that fateful day.
    THAT TRAGIC WEEK
    On April 19, America woke up to more mayhem — a manhunt for a terror suspect in suburban Boston. The whole city on lockdown. One suspect dead. Officer slain. Another officer shot. Thousands of officers geared up and ready for battle. It was utterly captivating. It was also almost unendurable, even at a distance, far from Boston. A person would be forgiven for turning off the television, shutting down the computer and going back to bed to hide under the covers. For those of a gentle disposition, this was all too much like an episode of “24” or a Bruce Willis movie. READ MORE HERE
    A SURVIVOR REMEMBERS
    The image showed James “Bim” Costello staggering away from the Boston Marathon bombing, his jeans shredded and blackened, his body so burned that he was left needing pig skin grafts on most of his right arm and right leg. Costello had plucked two rusty roofing nails from his stomach and was trying to walk toward any help he could find following the explosions, his ears ringing, his body pebbled with shrapnel, and his mind reeling from the thought moments earlier that he might be dying. READ MORE HERE
    A FAITH IN HUMANITY ENDURES
    Marc Fucarile lost his right leg above the knee in the Boston Marathon bombing, and doctors are still fighting to save his shattered left one. He has second- and third-degree burns and a piece of shrapnel lodged in his heart. He’s lost track of how many surgeries he’s had, with more still ahead. But he won’t allow the pain or the uncertainty of his future shake his spirit or destroy his faith in humanity. READ MORE HERE
    Page 2 of 2 - THE SUSPECTS' STORY
    America, the golden door, had already welcomed two of his brothers when Anzor Tsarnaev crossed the ocean with his family in 2002. Anzor’s brother Ruslan, who had immigrated just a few years earlier, already had a law degree and was on his way to an executive job and a six-figure salary. And at first, Anzor, his wife, Zubeidat, and their two sons, Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, seemed as energetic and brimming with initiative as their relatives had been. Anzor, a mechanic, fixed up cars. His wife turned a cut-rate apartment in affluent Cambridge into an improvised salon, offering facials at attractive prices. The boys — who authorities believe are the Boston Marathon bombers, responsible for killing four people and injuring more than 250 — took to their new home with gusto. The older one, Tamerlan, was sociable, even showy, dressing sharply, honing his body to become an Olympic boxer. He married an American WASP, daughter of a well-to-do Rhode Island family. READ MORE HERE
    THE BUSINESS TAKE
    I was born in Boston, raised in its suburbs, and learned my craft downtown. I drive on Boylston Street, watch the Marathon and root for the Red Sox. The senseless murder and mayhem wrought on my hometown on Patriots Day makes me terribly angry and very sad. What possible political statement, religious cause or frustrated anger can justify such an act? These deeds can’t be explained, except by the understanding that evil exists. Evil is real, innocents are maimed, and lives are changed forever. READ MORE HERE
    INSPIRATION
    "We will finish the race." That was the simple but resilient statement framed by dozens of running shoes forming the shape of a heart on the cover of Boston Magazine's May cover. READ MORE HERE
     

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